Tillynaught Bridge, Scotland

Tillynaught Bridge
Tillynaught Bridge
Tillynaught Bridge
Tillynaught Bridge
  • Construction, Infrastructure
  • Bridging, Engineering and Project Services
  • Aberdeen

Contact us

Jamie Clifton

Commercial Manager

+44 (0)1291 623801

Challenge

A day of heavy and persistent rain left the Milton of Tillynaught Bridge in Scotland severely damaged. In the following days, engineers set out to see how the bridge could be repaired, but before they could start work the bridge collapsed. The bridge crossed the Burn of Boyne River and provided vital links to nearby towns and villages. The collapse of the bridge meant that there was a two-mile detour diversion in place, causing an inconvenience to the local community and farmers who used the route.

Aberdeenshire Council approached Mabey looking for a solution that could replace the C-listed structure.

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Solution

Mabey provided Aberdeenshire Council with a number of options to allow them to come up with the most suitable solution for them and the local stakeholders of the project. Various options were considered and Mabey supported the planning and approval process to ensure that the best solution was found.

The Mabey Atlas™, which combines a unique pre-engineered, modular deck system with a plate girder fabrication, was the chosen solution. The 18m span by 5.25m wide bridge included a one metre wide raised walkway, providing a safe way to travel across the bridge for both pedestrians and vehicles. Mabey galvanised the bridge and then painted it in accordance with Aberdeenshire Council’s specification.

During the construction of the bridge, one of the challenges faced was the access to the site. The lanes leading up to the location of the bridge were narrow, therefore careful consideration had to be taken on the type of delivery vehicles and cranes that could used during construction.

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Result

The installation of the Mabey Atlas™ provides the local community with a robust and reliable bridge crossing over the Burn of Boyne River, helping them return back to normality following the floods.

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Downloads

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